FASD Management, Interventions & Strategies

Early intervention, appropriate support and management have been identified as factors that lead to better outcomes for children with FASD and their families.

Evidenced-based Interventions

Evidence-based interventions are therapies that have been shown through scientific studies, to consistently improve outcomes. The overseas experience tells us that children with FASD benefit from early intervention, but there are currently very few evidenced-based interventions and very few therapists currently using those that are.

A list of evidenced-based therapies can be found here: Evidenced-based interventions

Management Strategies

These strategies are based on the knowledge accumulated over many years from the collective wisdom of parents, carers and service providers

The following fact sheets provide information on common FASD behaviours and consequences. We have included a range of strategies and environmental accommodations that may help to improve quality of life outcomes.

Impulse Control
Information Processing
Memory
Patterns and Connections
Sensory Issues and Attention
Sleeping and Eating

Thank you to Suzanne Tofte Heacock for allowing us to share her great visual that was first uploaded to the “Shifting the paradigm: towards a neuro-behavioral approach to FASD” FB support group

More Resources:

Toolkit for Australian Parents/carers

Foster Parent’s Guide to FASD (S McLean- Australian publication)

I am a Caregiver of a person with FASD – this is an excellent parenting resource from the Canada FASD Research Network 

Baby Steps: Caring for babies with prenatal substance exposure

Who has to change? Trying their hardest, doing their best! –  What it is like to live with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

Strategies Not Solutions: A resource developed to educate caregivers and the community in managing the behaviours associated with FASD throughout the lifespan. The project relied heavily upon caregivers and professionals who provided information, advice, and feedback.

Tips for Parents and Caregivers: These tips and examples prepared by the FASD Network of Saskatchewan were compiled from years of experience as caregivers to individuals living with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder. The tips were meticulously researched and tested by the 12-member board that leads the Network.

Eight magic keys of success – nine short videos.

Behavioural Symptoms & Accommodations for FASD

Fred’s Story  In this video international expert Diane Malbin, explains why we need to think differently and try to prevent unwanted behaviour before it happens. This video complements Diane’s book “Trying Differently Rather than Harder”   available from her website or from Amazon 

Understanding Brain Impairment in FASD (Interactive) 

Advice for Families About FASD – a video from NOFAS-UK.

Handling escalation: from Anger to Out-of-Control  – a video from Oregon Behaviour Consultants

Other services for supporting children or adults who have FASD

There are many types of practical services that might help your child who has FASD. These can include occupational therapy, speech therapy and physiotherapy. Every child with FASD is different so if your child has a diagnosis, the health professional you consulted will help you work out which of these services may be necessary to best meet the needs of your child.

  • Occupational therapists support children and young people to develop their fine and gross motor skills, cognitive skills, social skills and independent living skills to increase success in their daily lives. They can also provide strategies that can help with sensory processing issues.
  • Speech therapists can support children with their speech development, receptive and expressive language development and visual resources and communication programs for children who are non-verbal or developing language.
  • Physiotherapists can provide treatment designed to enable children to achieve their own level of functional motor skills like sitting or standing. Toys, games and specialised equipment are used to encourage the development of the child’s motor skills, in conjunction with specific handling skills. The physiotherapy program becomes part of the child’s activities during the day, as parents are shown the best way to assist their child during the day to day care and play

Go to the FASD Hub Australia  Service Directory for a listing of health professionals who have experience and expertise working with children who have FASD or contact the NOFASD Parent helpline (free call) 1300 306 238.

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